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18502 Burnside Bridge Road, Sharpsburg, MD 21782

Maryland

COMING SOON!

Farm4 Bedrooms2 Bathrooms2 Half Bathrooms4,000 SqftPool: None

Property Details

  • COMING SOON!
  • Property Type: Farm
  • Pool: None
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Stories: 3
  • Bathrooms: 2
  • Property Status: For Sale
  • Half Bathrooms: 2
  • Acreage: 130 Acres
  • Fireplaces: 4
  • Square Footage: 4,000
  • Year Built: 1850
  • Adjacent To Antietam Battlefield - Antietam Creek - Bank Barn - Elegant Master Suite - Exposed Log Walls - Gourmet Kitchen - Historically significant - Log Construction - Organic Farming - Original Cook Oven - Original Hearth - Original Smoke House - Original Wood Floors - Rolling Fenced Pastures
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      Historic Noah Rohrbach Farm c.1850

      A beautiful 130 acre historically significant farm near Washington, DC. Excellent opportunity for an organic farm, vineyard, equestrian farm, country inn…
      Adjacent to the Antietam National Battlefield with rolling hills, fenced pastures, large bank barn & outbuildings, Antietam Creek, 4 bedrooms with master-suite, gourmet kitchen & much more!

      Maryland Historical Trust (WA-II-363)

      “The property is immediately adjacent to the Antietam National Battlefield, just south of the location of the important Civil War engagement that occurred at the Burnside Bridge, where Burnside’s Union troops held positions at the north end of the Pieper Property. Thus the property was associated with the Civil War events for which the battlefield is significant. In addition. the farmstead and surrounding farmlands contribute to the cultural landscape setting for the battlefield. When inventoried in 1978. the property included a mid-19th century house. bake oven. smoke house, spring house, and 20th century bank barn. According to SHA’s March 15. 1994 letter the sole building dating to the period of the dwelling is the smoke house. Thus. it is not clear how many of the domestic outbuildings mentioned in the inventory form remain standing. However. if the spring house, smoke house and bake oven all remain, they would constitute an unusually rich collection of domestic outbuildings common to the 19th century farmhouse in rural Maryland. The farmstead is significant as a representative of Washington County’s 19th and early 20th century agricultural heritage. The large frame L-shaped farmhouse is of architectural interest. The house has an unusual roof construction, consisting of a combination of hipped and gabled joints, which is found on several other mid-19th century houses in the Sharpsburg area. The unusual configuration allows the house to appear larger than it is from the road. The house exhibits Greek Revival and Victorian influences in the treatment of the porches.”

      “Although the Noah Rohrbach House appears from the road to be of frame¬†construction, it is actually a log house held up by immense oak timbers hand mortise-and-tenoned together in a heavy skeleton. Moreover, this log skeleton is actually recycled and relocated from a much earlier structure. Studies of the building hardware, such as the bevel-sided, cast-iron rim locks, suggested a date of about 1850 for the current appearance. However, the 12″-thick walls of the structure are of vertical-post log construction, a system where the horizontal logs are let into posts at corners and intermediate points in the wall, rather than, say, lapped with notches. This sophisticated system, which uses carefully constructed mortise-and-tenon joints, was common from the 1820s to the 1860s and represents some 5% of the log houses built in western Maryland. What is even more unusual about the house is that there is no evidence of chinking or daubing in the spaces between logs. Typically, the timbers for a log house were cut, shaped, and erected while the logs were green, and allowed to dry and shrink over about a two year period, compressing the chinking between the logs. The lack of chinking between the logs of the Rohrbach house indicates a probable re-use of a previously existing log structure, which had long since dried and shrunk to a stable form. The large L-shaped house stands two stories in height, with a stone basement containing two windows and two doors exposed on the west side. The house is six bays wide along its west elevation. The first¬†floor of this elevation (as well as the basement below) is covered by a hip-roofed Victorian porch with turned posts, corner brackets, and a sawn work balustrade. The southernmost bay of the porch consists of steps leading down to ground level. The door, with a transom above, stands in the third bay from the right. The south facade is five bays wide, with a small Greek Revival style portico covering an entrance in the center bay. The house has an unusual roof construction, consisting of a combination of hipped and gabled joints, which is found on several other mid-19th century houses in the Sharpsburg area. The unusual configuration allows the house to appear larger from the road than it actually is. The roof is covered with standing-seam metal. The house was completely restored in 2001, including replacement and repair of several termite-ridden framing members and the large wooden lintel over the basement fireplace. The Noah Rohrbach House is historically significant for its architecture, its outbuildings, and its association with the Civil War. When inventoried in 1978, the property included the house, bake oven, smoke house, spring house, and 20th century bank barn. If the spring house, smoke house, and bake oven all remain, they would constitute an unusually rich collection of domestic outbuildings common to the 19th century farmhouse in rural Maryland. The farmstead is significant as a representative of Washington County’s 19th and early 20th century agricultural heritage. The property stands immediately adjacent to the Antietam National Battlefield, just south of the location of the important Civil War engagement that occurred at the Burnside Bridge, where Burnside’s Union troops held positions at the north end of the property. Thus the property was associated with the Civil War events for which the battlefield itself is significant. In addition, the farmstead and surrounding farmlands contribute to the cultural landscape setting for Antietam National Battlefield.”
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    Gary Gestson

    Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

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