Searching Inventory...

17700 Carter Lane, Hagerstown, MD 21740

Maryland

$524,900

Single Family Home5+ Bedrooms2 Bathrooms1 Half Bathrooms2,868 SqftPool: Private

Property Details

  • $524,900
  • Property Type: Single Family Home
  • MLS Number: WA10220670
  • Pool: Private
  • Bedrooms: 5+
  • Stories: 4
  • Bathrooms: 2
  • Property Status: For Sale
  • Half Bathrooms: 1
  • Acreage: 23.97
  • Fireplaces: 5
  • Square Footage: 2,868
  • Year Built: 1790
  • 5 Fireplaces with Wood Mantels - Chair Rail - Faux Painted Doors - Full Attic - Full Cellar - Historic significance - In-ground Pool - Includes 2BR/2BA Tenant House (on a separate/additional 1 acre plot) - Marsh Run Creek - NEW Kitchen Renovation - Original Spring House - Original Wood Floors - Original Wood mantels - Vaulted Cellar Ceilings - Wall to Wall Carpeting
    Request a Private Showing

      Historic Agreed In Peace c.1790
      This beautifully restored 5 bedroom stone historic farm house and 24 gorgeous acres can be found down a long country lane, just minutes from Hagerstown, Maryland. Nestled in a private setting that seems to have ignored the rest of the world’s frantic march to modernity, this farm features the original 2 story stone spring house, includes 2BR/2BA Tenant House (on a separate/additional 1 acre plot), Marsh Run Creek, pastures for livestock or farming, mature wooded areas, a full complement of wildlife and an enormous amount of charm. The stone house has a delightful front porch with views of the acreage, original wood floors, newly renovated kitchen, 5 fireplaces with original wood mantels and much more.

      This is a home of rare and beautiful distinction, close to Baltimore & DC, yet a world away.

      ROOMS

      Main Floor
      Living Room 17′ x 12′ – Wood floor, fireplace (decorative) with wood mantel, chair rail, staircase, ceiling fan, 2 windows.
      Formal Parlor 15′ x 15′ – Wood floor, fireplace with wood mantel (gas insert), hanging lamp, 3 windows.
      Formal Dining Room 15′ x 10′ – Wood floor, hanging lamp, closet, clothes pegs, 2 windows.
      Den/Dining Room 17′ x 14′ – Carpet, fireplace with wood mantel (wood stove), closet, chair rail, 1 window.
      Kitchen (NEW!) 14′ x 10′ – Wood floor, double sink, granite counters, track lighting, stainless steel appliances, large walk-in pantry, door to Mud Room, 1 window.
      Powder Room 5′ x 4′ – Wood floor.
      Family Room 13′ x 11′ – Vinyl floor, ceiling fan, exposed stone wall, door to yard, 3 windows.

      2nd Floor
      Landing 12 x 12′ – Wood floor, track lighting.
      Hall Bathroom 8′ x 6′ – Vinyl floor, bathtub,  laundry closet, 1 window.
      Bedroom 1 11′ x 7′ – Vinyl floor, door to porch, 1 window.
      Bedroom 2 12′ x 7′ – Carpet, clothes pegs, 1 window.
      Bedroom 3 16 x 15′ – Wood floor, ceiling fan, fireplace with wood mantel (gas insert), clothes pegs, 3 windows.
      Bedroom 4 18′ x 15′ – Carpet, ceiling fan, fireplace with wood mantel (gas insert), 3 windows.
      Bedroom 5 12′ x 12′ – Carpet, clothes pegs, 1 window.
      *Dressing Room 9′ x 9′ – Carpet, 3 closets, 2 windows.
      *Bathroom 7′ x 7′ – Vinyl floor, double sink, bath tub, 1 window.

      3rd Floor
      Full Walk-up Attic.

      Basement Cellar
      3 rooms, 2 with vaulted ceilings.
      “Among the most unusual features of this house are the barrel vaults in the cellar which display an outstanding stone working technique”.
      ________________

      In-ground Pool

      OUT-BUILDINGS
      Spring House (vintage structure)
      Shed

      TENANT/GUEST HOUSE (on it’s own 1 acre lot)

      Charming, 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms & lots of room to garden.

      HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE

      This complex of buildings is primarily significant for its architecture. The two story, four bay dwelling built of native limestone is representative of a major architectural group in the area. Houses following the four bay plan with off-center front doors occur in great numbers in southern Pennsylvania, northern and western Maryland, eastern West Virginia and northern Virginia. The use of limestone as a building material is prevalent in the same area, coinciding with the geological incidence of limestone and with the cultural influence of Pennsylvania. Houses of this type in Washington County date from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The exact building date of this house has not been determined, The carefully executed exterior stone work is associated with late 18th century buildings in Washington County. The interior and exterior woodwork and hardware, however, appear to date from the second quarter of the 19th century. Among the most unusual features of this house are the barrel vaults in the cellar which display an outstanding stone working technique.
      More MHT>>>

      HISTORIC SUMMARY

      This farm complex is located at the end of a long private lane extending in a northwesterly direction from College Road near St. James School east of Williamsport in Washington County, Maryland. The house is situated on gently sloping ground and faces south.
      The dwelling is a two story, four bay structure constructed of coursed local limestone cut in fairly uniform size and shape. There is no decorative masonry associated with the exterior of the house. Attached to its rear elevation is a two story modern frame addition.
      First and second story windows are aligned with each other at the front and side elevations. All windows have narrow rounded frames which hold nine over six pane double hung sashes at the first story level and six over six light sashes at the second floor. At the front elevation first story windows are flanked by pairs of three panel shutters while openings at the second story display louvered shutters.
      The main entrance to the house is located in the third bay from its west end. The door is framed similarly to the windows and includes a four light transom. Surrounding the six panel door are paneled jambs with matching trim. A small shed roofed porch shelters the door.
      The roof of the house is covered with sheet metal and terminates with barge boards set directly against the end walls. Deep returns are cut into the end walls at the eaves which are finished with boxing trimmed with a simple course of molding. Brick chimneys with one course of corbeling at their tops are located inside each gable end.
      The interior of the house is divided into four rooms at the first story level. The main entrance opens into a large room from which a stairway enclosed behind a partition with a doorway leads to the second floor. At the first story level, fireplaces are located in the southwest and northeast rooms. Oval panels and colonettes trim the parlor fireplace mantel. In the southwest room symmetrical molded trim with decorated corner blocks is applied to the door and window frames. Carpenter locks appear on first story interior doors while lift latches are used at the second story level.
      In the cellar of the house double barrel vaults of carefully cut radiating stones support the house. The vaults are set parallel to the front and rear elevations and are entered through an archway located toward its east end. The original purpose of the vaults other than support for the house and as root cellars has not been determined.
      Located immediately east of the house is a two bay, one and a half story stone spring house with a stone chimney located inside its west gable end…The main buildings on the property are in excellent condition.
      More MHT>>>

      CHAIN OF TITLE

      During and perhaps prior to the early 19th century this property was owned by members of the Rowland family who had considerable land holdings in the immediate vicinity. After the death of Jonathan Rowland in 1853, the farm was sold to Joseph Gehr of Berkeley County, Virginia (l.N.10/89). In quick succession the farm passed from Joseph Gehr to Samuel Hoover in 1862 (l.N.16/117), who sold it to Henry Gantz in 1665 (L.B.N.1./47), who in turn sold it to F. Dorsey Herbert in 1868 (L.B.N.2/527). In 1881, the farm was purchased by Elias Young (80/472). It remained under Young ownership until 1917 (151/24). In 1919, it was purchased by Edwin B. and Ida G. Carter and remained in that family until 1972.
      The farm includes parts of the land grants ”Conococheague Manor” and “Agreed in Peace.” Conococheague Manor was a tract of nearly 11,000 acres in the Williamsport vicinity which was held by Lord Baltimore until about 1767.
      More MHT>>>

      LINKS

      Maryland Historical Trust – Agreed In Peace c.1790
      Property Boundaries – GIS Boundary Map
      Washington County Historical Trust – All things historic in Washington County
      Nearby Schools – St. James School

      All information is deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

      _______________
      Contact me to schedule an appointment

      Gary Gestson
      Certified Historic Properties Specialist
      Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.
      189 Kentlands Blvd.
      Gaithersburg, MD 20878
      gary@HistoricHomeTeam.com
      301-975-9500 ext.4604 Office
      301-646-0046 Mobile

      Print Friendly, PDF & Email

    Gary Gestson

    Follow us on Twitter

    Language Translator